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What’s next for power generation in North Africa?

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From the Middle East to North Africa power generation has been a hot topic for officials this week. With power demands forever increasing all eyes are on North Africa and they need to think fast!

Why? The GCC (Gulf Cooperation Council) currently represent 47% of 148 GW of the current Middle East and North Africa (Mena) power.

So what does this mean? In order for North Africa to generate capacity they will require a total of $137 billion over the next five years for generation.

Demand is high

Growth in power generation has led to a higher demand in electricity despite there being projections for lower economic growth. The APICORP (Arab Petroleum Investments Corporation) estimated that demand for electricity will grow at an average of eight percent by 2020.

So let’s a make change!

North Africa states need to invest $334 billion over the next five years to meet rising power demand within the Mena region. As previously stated in the report above over $198 billion will need to add 147 gigawatts (GW) of generating capacity until 2020, to the existing 315GW capacity.

As well as this Kenya`s state owned utility power is yet to install 20 new transformers in the North coast by the end of June, as an effort to stabilise electricity supply within the area and address frequent outages.

Kenya are set out to improve their overall energy supply due to a few challenges the region has been experiencing. Transformer installations will ensure that power lines are clear of trees and branches as well as replacing broken insulators, jumper rehabilitation and reconductoring high and medium voltage lines. The project will also involve installation of new and low medium voltage lines in order to ease pressure on the network in the North Coast, as well as upgrading on the existing transformers and distribution lines.

As power demand increases it is essential North Africa generate enough capacity over the next 5 years. How will they get on? We will keep you posted!

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